Get Involved

Keep Riverside Clean and Beautiful

magavenue-historicalThrough the Keep Riverside Clean and Beautiful Program (KRCB), Temple Beth El has adopted a one mile stretch of Arlington Ave between Victoria and Indiana Aves. Our contract with KRCB Program calls for our TBE team to be out there six times a year, generally every other month. It’s a great opportunity for families to participate and a way to earn public service credits if you’re applying for a campership, need to fulfill public service requirements for school, or need a mitzvah project for a Bar or Bat Mitzvah. This is a long term project that’s easy, requires just a little organization, and shows that TBE is part of the community of Riverside. While we have one mile, we actually have two miles of area (one mile on each side of Arlington Ave). The City of Riverside furnishes picker-upper tools and safety vests, but you may bring your own tools and gloves as well as a snack, water and plastic bags. All participants sign a waiver. Wear old clothes. All kinds of talents are welcome – even kibbitzers! Wagons are a good idea for little workers. All workers under 16 must be under adult supervision.
Meet Wednesdays every other month in the Target parking lot.

If you, your family or your group would like to join us, please contact Lynn Lipscomb at (951) 684-4511

 

Reform Judaism & Social Action

JFK Eisendrath“The core of our insight [as Reform Jews] is that serious Jewish study inevitably leads to the soup kitchen; that serious prayer, among other vital things, is a way of preparing to do battle with injustice, that social justice without being grounded in text, without a sense of God’s presence, is ephemeral and unsustainable.
The heart of the argument is that there is no such thing as ‘Social Action Judaism,’ that the thread of social justice is so authentically and intricately woven into the many colored fabric we call Judaism that if you seek to pull that thread out, the entire fabric unravels, that the Judaism that results is distorted, is neutered, is rendered aimless.”

Rabbi David Saperstein, Director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism